Learn How to Become a Mortgage Field Service Inspector

Interior Inspections

Work Codes:

[Occupancy-Interior, WT, Interior Inspections]
[MCS and M&M-Where Instructions State to Complete Interior]

 PHOTO REQUIREMENT: (26 min photos)

  • All Required Photos for Vacant Properties, PLUS all of the following:
  • Lockbox Photo / Keycode
  • Close up photo of the keycode that you entered the property with.
  • Every Room in the House (Some clients require ceilings)
  • Open Toilet (Capture bowl and tank bottom in one shot)
  • Furnace (Only those accessible)
  • Hot Water Tank
  • Sign In Sheet
  • Sump Pump (Usually found in the basement) with volt stick photo proving elect. on or off
  • Dehumidifiers (If onsite)
  • All Damages
  • Personal Property Items

 

download DO  NOT  ATTEMPT  TO  CONDUCT  AN  INTERIOR  INSPECTION  ON  AN  OCCUPIED  PROPERTY! 

 

These inspections require us to enter and inspect the interior of the property as well as the exterior.  We gain entrance to the interior of the property either by using the keys that NMFS sent to you, or by the use of an existing Lockbox.

lockboxes

 

The various lockbox codes can be found in the Info/Comments tab of the work order. 

Not all Interior inspections have a lockbox. If that is the case use the set of keys that we mailed to you.
(We will mail you a set of keys once we receive your ID Photo so that we can make an ID Badge for you.)

 

Regardless as to which key you use to enter, either from the lockbox or NMFS keys, enter the keycode you used to enter the property on your InspectorADE cell phone app on the Info/Comments tab, in the Property Notes section.

Keycode Property Notes

 

Take a photo of the lockbox with the lockbox opened, and the key in the door, with the door partially opened.  This shows that there is indeed a key in the lockbox, that the key fits the door, and the key opens the door. If you used NMFS keys to enter, take a close up photo of the key in the lock, showing the keycode number.  (No blurry photos please)

mmm photos

 

Interior Inspections With No Means of Access

At times inspectors will arrive at a property to complete an interior inspection only to find that:

  • The lockbox is no longer present.
  • The key has been removed from the lockbox.
  • The lockbox no longer opens with the combination that our Client provided.
  • NMFS supplied keys do not open any of the doors.

To avoid being sent back to the property for additional information, follow these guidelines:

If it seems that no lock-box is present:

  • Check all areas before reporting no lock-box—many times lock-boxes are installed on the rear or side door.
  • Check spigots, fences, gas meter, and other areas for the lock-box, as realtors may have moved it.
  • Photograph ALL doors to verify that the lock-box is not present.

If the combination provided does not open the lock-box:

Take a clear photo of the tumblers in the position of the combination that is provided from your work order, to prove that you attempted to open the box.
lockboxcode

 

 

 

 

If the key from the lock-box does not work, or your NMFS supplied keys do not work:

Take a photo of the key in the knob lock showing the key was tried, but would not turn or unlock the door.
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If the key is missing from inside the lock-box:

Take a photo of the lock-box key storage chamber to show that there is no key inside.

Taking the appropriate photos on the initial visit will help you to avoid making a return trip to the property. With the photos you provide, clients can make educated decisions on how to handle cases where we cannot access the interior.

Read the work order to see if the client requires a call from onsite if access can’t be gained using key codes or lockbox codes: 

Some clients (NFN) do require the inspector to call from onsite if access can’t be gained using provided lockbox or key codes.  These calls must be documented.  Some provide realtor names and numbers and require they be contacted for lockbox codes.  Make sure to read the work order and follow the instructions to prevent a return back to  the property at your own expense.

If a key code number has been provided on the work order form but your key does not open the door, take a close up photo of the key in the door so that our client can read the key code number on the key. Do this for every door and for every key code listed.
keycode

 

 

 

 

 

 

Read the work order to see if the client requires a call from onsite if access can’t be gained using key codes or lockbox codes: 

images (16)

Some clients do require the inspector to call from onsite if access can’t be gained using provided lockbox or key codes.  These calls must be documented.  Some provide realtor names and numbers and require they be contacted for lockbox codes.  Make sure to read the work order and follow the instructions to prevent a return back to  the property at your own expense.

 

SIDE NOTE: Don’t forget to take all the required exterior photos as well!         

                               

Inside the Property

Once inside the property we need to look around the entire house for roof leaks, mold, water damage, signs of vermin etc.  When you inspect a property always look under sinks, in closets, around bathroom, and around hot water tanks for mold and water damage. Take a flashlight in with you when doing so that way nothing is missed.

Gas leaks and water leaks require contact with the local utility company to have these services repaired or turned off. Then call your NMFS Account Manager to report the condition.

Take a photo of every room (excluding closets…unless damaged).  Make sure your kitchen photos show all the appliances. You can also take separate photos of the appliances, dishwasher, stove, etc.

Every bathroom and every toilet requires a photo. The photo of the toilet(s) are taken by standing over the toilet looking straight down so the picture captures the tank bottom and toilet bowl all in one shot. If a toilet tank lid is present, remove it in order that the tank bottom can be seen in the photo.  The purpose of this photo is to show how much, if any, anti-freeze is present in the tank and bowl. It’s a good idea to wear latex gloves during interior inspections. Do Not break the plastic wrap or seal tape that may be around a toilet bowl.

1570_LOIS_LANE-111233024

 

Take a photo of the sign-in sheet after you add your name to it. Enter your name as NMFS / (your initials).
You can find all client specific sign-in sheets in the Resources tab or you can DOWNLOAD the most common ones here.

signinsheet

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Take photos of personal property that you feel has a value of $100 or more. (Garage Sale Value)

Provide proof photos typical of any debris.

Take photos of all mold present at the property.  Any mold less than a 2×2 square foot area places the interior of the property in Fair condition.  Mold that has expanded further than 2 square feet is considered Poor condition.  In the Comment section of the report, write: “Existing mold present, health hazard.”

Inspecting Properties With Mold

 

Interior Inspection Tips

Tip:  Mark the upper right corner with a list of appliance(s) onsite.  By doing so you’ll remember what to look for during the next visit.  Also, if you get back to your car and forgot what appliances are there, just take a look at your sign-in sheet photo.

Tip:  Mark somewhere on the sign-in sheet all the damages or mold issues.  These have to be reported each and every time an inspections occurs. If you marked it down once, and then forget on your next visit, you will get a Follow-Up to make you go back.

Tip:  Entering the lockbox code that works onto the work order form, under Property Notes, saves time on your next visit.

 

images (15)

Removing items from a vacant property is grounds for immediate dismissal and possible legal action.  Even though the property may appear abandoned to you, everything you find in the house belongs to someone.  It belongs to either the previous home owner or to the bank.  It is not up for grabs.  Do Not Take Anything From Vacant Properties.

Case Example:  One of our reps inspected a vacant property and discovered a TV in one of the bedrooms.  She came back later that night with her boyfriend. They backed the car up and loaded up the TV.  This was out in the country and they didn’t think anyone was watching, but a neighbor near by saw them.  The police were called and the rep and her boyfriend were arrested. The mortgage company found out and pressed burglary charges.

download Do you really think someone is going to leave a “working” TV abandoned in a house?  BTW, the TV did not work – The rep now has a Felony burglary charge.  Of course we had to fire her as well.

 

Interior Inspections With No Means of Access

At times inspectors will arrive at a property to complete an interior inspection only to find that:

  • The lockbox is no longer present.
  • The key has been removed from the lockbox.
  • The lockbox no longer opens with the combination that our Client provided.

To avoid being sent back to the property for additional information, follow these guidelines:

If it seems that no lock-box is present:

  • Check all areas before reporting no lock-box—many times lock-boxes are installed on the rear or side door.
  • Check spigots, fences, gas meter, and other areas for the lock-box, as realtors may have moved it.
  • Photograph ALL doors to verify that the lock-box is not present.

If the combination provided does not open the lock-box:

Take a clear photo of the tumblers in the position of the combination that is provided from your work order, to prove that you attempted to open the box.

If the key from the lock-box does not work:

Take a photo of the key in the knob lock showing the key was tried, but would not turn or unlock the door.

If the key is missing from inside the lock-box:

Take a photo of the lock-box key storage chamber to show that there is no key inside.

Taking the appropriate photos on the initial visit will help you to avoid making a return trip to the property. With the photos you provide, clients can make educated decisions on how to handle cases where we cannot access the interior.

Read the work order to see if the client requires a call from onsite if access can’t be gained using key codes or lockbox codes: 

Some clients do require the inspector to call from onsite if access can’t be gained using provided lockbox or key codes.  These calls must be documented.  Some provide realtor names and numbers and require they be contacted for lockbox codes.  Make sure to read the work order and follow the instructions to prevent a return back to  the property at your own expense.

If a key code number has been provided on the work order form but your key does not open the door, take a close up photo of the key in the door so that our client can read the key code number on the key.


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